Culinary Anthropologist

eat slow britain

  1. The Sun Inn

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    Excerpt from Eat Slow Britain by Alastair Sawday & Anna Colquhoun: “People in Essex wanting good pasta or risotto come here,” says the Sun Inn’s proud Neapolitan chef, Ugo Simonelli. This fifteenth-century coaching inn may look quintessentially English, but the passion for good food and conviviality evoke an Italian trattoria. Owner Piers Baker says: “Sundays […]

  2. Elan Valley Mutton

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    Excerpt from Eat Slow Britain by Alastair Sawday & Anna Colquhoun: If Tony Davies’ great-great-grandfather could see Henfron Farm now, he would hardly notice the difference. Here in the remote Elan Valley, in mid-Wales, seventeen-hundred acres of wind- and rain-swept moorland, peat bogs and heathered hillsides sustain the Davies’ resilient Welsh Mountain sheep, just as […]

  3. The Mistley Thorn

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    Excerpt from Eat Slow Britain by Alastair Sawday & Anna Colquhoun: As a teenager, Sherri Singleton sold watermelon fruit cups on the beach in Los Angeles for pocket money. It was the first of a series of successful culinary enterprises, stretching from California to Essex, where she now runs two restaurants and a cooking school. […]

  4. Whitmuir Farm

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    Excerpt from Eat Slow Britain by Alastair Sawday & Anna Colquhoun: … At first cattle and lambs were trucked four-hundreds miles to a slaughter house in Devon, from where meat travelled to supermarkets across Britain. If supply outstripped demand, orders were reduced or delayed without notice. If animals grew too large, they were rejected as […]

  5. The Olive Branch

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    Excerpt from Eat Slow Britain by Alastair Sawday & Anna Colquhoun: “The Olive Branch is more than a pub, it’s a community project, too,” says Ben Jones, who with old friends Sean Hope and Marcus Welford, managed to get their hands on the pub before it was sold as a house. Locals were delighted: with […]

  6. Dorset Oysters

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    Excerpt from Eat Slow Britain by Alastair Sawday & Anna Colquhoun: … The farming of oysters dates back to at least Roman or Greek times. For millennia people have believed in their health-giving properties: Parisians and Londoners used to buy oysters by the hundred, Cicero ate them to nourish his eloquence and Louis XI swallowed […]

  7. The Thomas Lord

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    Excerpt from Eat Slow Britain by Alastair Sawday & Anna Colquhoun:The Thomas Lord pub does not serve orange juice. And don’t expect Tabasco with your Bloody Mary, parmesan on your pasta or lemon with your fish. Instead there will be local Hill Farm apple juice, Fireball hot sauce, Lyburn farmhouse cheese and lemon thyme butter. […]

  8. Riverford Organic Vegetables

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    Excerpt from Eat Slow Britain by Alastair Sawday & Anna Colquhoun: … [Guy Watson] has seen a massive change in people’s aspirations.  “The time of greed, excess and Thatcher’s children seems to have ended,” he says.  “Once again people are seeing virtue in thrift.”  Citing the number of people taking up allotments and ‘home restaurants’ […]

  9. Strattons

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    Excerpt from Eat Slow Britain by Alastair Sawday and Anna Colquhoun: “Our parents grew up in the war years and taught us not to waste a thing, which is how we’ve run Strattons since the start. High quality and care for the environment can go hand in hand without compromises,” says Vanessa Scott, owner of […]

  10. Stichelton Dairy

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    Excerpt from Eat Slow Britain by Alastair Sawday and Anna Colquhoun: Britain was once teeming with cheesemakers: in the 1930s over sixteen-hundred farms were making it. By the early nineties that number had dwindled to one-hundred, due to post-war industrialisation of cheesemaking, supermarkets driving demand for mass-produced cheese and food safety concerns. The number is […]

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