Culinary Anthropologist

people who make stuff

  1. The milk of human kindness

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    We are in the Rodopi Mountains in southern Bulgaria, pondering why it is people here are said to live longer than anywhere else.  The fresh air and clean spring water?  The famous yoghurt (or “sour milk”, as it is classified here)?  Or perhaps what must be Bulgaria’s national dish – fresh salad piled high with […]

  2. Hubbub

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    Hubbub is a fantastic idea.  As more people abandon their local shops in favour of the convenience of supermarkets, Hubbub has stepped in to fix the missing link.  The lovely Hubbub people go to all the best local shops near me in north London (butcher, fishmonger, cheesemonger, deli…) and bring their goodies to your door.  […]

  3. Riverford Cooks

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    Riverford delivers delicious veg boxes from its network of sister organic farms across England.  I have been a customer for some time and greatly admire their business ethics and the high quality of their produce.  I wrote about them in my book Eat Slow Britain – see here for an excerpt.  Riverford Cooks is their […]

  4. Elan Valley Mutton

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    Excerpt from Eat Slow Britain by Alastair Sawday & Anna Colquhoun: If Tony Davies’ great-great-grandfather could see Henfron Farm now, he would hardly notice the difference. Here in the remote Elan Valley, in mid-Wales, seventeen-hundred acres of wind- and rain-swept moorland, peat bogs and heathered hillsides sustain the Davies’ resilient Welsh Mountain sheep, just as […]

  5. Whitmuir Farm

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    Excerpt from Eat Slow Britain by Alastair Sawday & Anna Colquhoun: … At first cattle and lambs were trucked four-hundreds miles to a slaughter house in Devon, from where meat travelled to supermarkets across Britain. If supply outstripped demand, orders were reduced or delayed without notice. If animals grew too large, they were rejected as […]

  6. Dorset Oysters

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    Excerpt from Eat Slow Britain by Alastair Sawday & Anna Colquhoun: … The farming of oysters dates back to at least Roman or Greek times. For millennia people have believed in their health-giving properties: Parisians and Londoners used to buy oysters by the hundred, Cicero ate them to nourish his eloquence and Louis XI swallowed […]

  7. Riverford Organic Vegetables

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    Excerpt from Eat Slow Britain by Alastair Sawday & Anna Colquhoun: … [Guy Watson] has seen a massive change in people’s aspirations.  “The time of greed, excess and Thatcher’s children seems to have ended,” he says.  “Once again people are seeing virtue in thrift.”  Citing the number of people taking up allotments and ‘home restaurants’ […]

  8. Stichelton Dairy

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    Excerpt from Eat Slow Britain by Alastair Sawday and Anna Colquhoun: Britain was once teeming with cheesemakers: in the 1930s over sixteen-hundred farms were making it. By the early nineties that number had dwindled to one-hundred, due to post-war industrialisation of cheesemaking, supermarkets driving demand for mass-produced cheese and food safety concerns. The number is […]

  9. Growing Communities

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    Excerpt from Eat Slow Britain by Alastair Sawday & Anna Colquhoun: Hidden from the road behind townhouses and tucked into the corner of an East London park is a secret oasis where cheery volunteers tend a cornucopia of fruits, herbs, flowers and salad leaves, destined for a ground-breaking box scheme. “We don’t just want to […]

  10. Argan oil

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    Argan oil is only produced in Morocco, the only country in which the ancient argan tree grows.  The region from Essaouira to Agadir and inland, particularly the Souss Valley, is full of scrawny, wild, drought resistant argan trees.  Families have collected, cracked and ground argan nuts for their own homemade oil for centuries.

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