Results tagged “bread”

Home Bread workshops, Sat 1st & Sun 2nd February 2014

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smhomebreadmarch20130004.jpgWe will focus on how to fit making your own bread into a busy life. Who has the time to knead dough after work every day, let alone wait for it to rise twice before you bake it? At this class you will learn cunning techniques and recipes for making your own delicious bread effortlessly, and without using a bread machine!

smbreadclassesnov20110019.jpgAfter this hands-on intensive workshop you will be able to make a range of easy breads - classic white boules, walnut and olive breads, focaccia, naan and flatbreads - without any of them being a chore. Homemade pizza or pitta on a school night will suddenly become a possibility! You will work with a range of top quality organic and stoneground flours including wholewheat, malted and spelt.

homebreadclass.jpgWhat’s more you will go home with a homemade bread-making kit specially sourced by Anna which will include all the essentials you need to get going immediately, even your own tub of bread dough to last you the week and wooden peel for loading bread into the oven. Plus of course there will be plenty of the freshly baked bread you have made to take home.

The workshop includes a delicious seasonal lunch showcasing different types of bread. You can see pictures from previous Home Bread classes here, here and here.

ArtisanBreadNov20120067.jpgDates: Saturday 1st February, repeated Sunday 2nd February 2014

Time: 10am - 4pm

Location: London N5

Price: £120, or two for £216

To book: Email Anna

Please read the booking terms & conditions before booking your place. Thank you.

Home Bread in a Day, Fri 25th, Sat 26th & Sun 27th Nov 2011

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Food Safari new logo.bmpsm5minartisanbread0009.jpgThis workshop is a partnership between Culinary Anthropologist and the lovely Food Safari people.

We will focus on how to fit making your own bread into a busy lifestyle.  Who has the time to knead dough after work every day, let alone wait for it to rise twice before you bake it?  At this class you will learn cunning techniques and recipes for making your own artisan style bread without using a bread machine. 

artisanbreadt.jpgAfter this hands-on intensive workshop you will be able to make a range of breads - classic white boules, walnut and olive breads, rye sourdough loaves, focaccia, naan and flatbreads - without any of them being a chore.  Homemade pizza or pitta on a school night will suddenly become a possibility!

What’s more you will go home with a homemade bread-making kit specially sourced by Anna which will include all the essentials you need to get going immediately, even your own bread dough and sourdough starter.  Plus of course there will be plenty of the freshly baked bread you have made to take home. 

The workshop includes a delicious seasonal lunch showcasing different types of bread.

5minartisanbread2803110009.jpgDates:  Friday 25th November 2011, repeated Sat 26th Nov and Sun 27th Nov

Time:  10am - 4pm

Location:  London N5

Price:  £150, or £275 for two

Book online on the Food Safari website
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Or email Anna with any queries or to ask about the special discount for Culinary Anthropologist customers

Beetroot gazpacho

spain
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This twist on the traditional Spanish tomato and bread soup was inspired by a delicious beetroot version I had at La Taberna del Pindal in Arenas de Cabrales in Asturias, Spain.  The trick is to roast half the beetroot to bring out its lush sweetness, and grate the other half raw to keep its vibrant colour and fresh taste. Combined with the usual tomatoes, peppers and onions it makes a fantastic purple gazpacho, which is even better the day after it’s made, when the sweet, sour, earthy and bright flavours really seem to sing together.  So, if possible, start this recipe one or two days ahead. I used sourdough rye bread as it’s what I had, and it seemed right with beetroot, in a northern European sort of way.

smbeetrootgazpacho0003.JPG

Moroccan bread

morocco
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Bread is big in Morocco.  A meal is not complete without bread, and it is always fresh and always good.  You wouldn’t catch anyone mopping up their tagine with white sliced ‘plastic’ bread.  It has to be the real deal.

ChezAfida0007.JPGMany of my memories from Morocco involve bread: women at home kneeling on the floor kneading dough in a gsar (wide earthenware dish); rounds of dough rising underneath warm Smbreadoven0001.JPGsheepskins; children in the street ferrying loaves on planks of wood on their heads to and from the neighbourhood bakery; men baking thousands of loaves each day in huge wood-fired ovens, the smell wafting out onto the street; or women in mountain villages baking one at a time in  tiny home-made mud ovens at home; people arriving home with their freshly baked loaves for dinner, each marked with the family’s own signature gashes; the delicious combination of fresh bread and olive oil, enjoyed on arrival in many homes; the mother of the household tearing the warm disks into rough wedges and plonking them in front of each diner, shouting “eat, eat!” 

Morocco part 2: muffins and cheddar

morocco
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Smriverburst0001.jpgBy the time we'd got over the highest part of the High Atlas, it had started to rain.  As we came down through the plains towards Marrakesh, we noticed some of the little streams were starting to overflow, and fields starting to look really quite damp.  Then we came round a corner and realised we weren't going any further - rivers here can overrun bridges at a moment's notice.  Sadly, after turning round, we realised we weren't going back either: the little overflowing streams of ten minutes ago had now become rivers overrunning bridges too.  We could sit and wait, or take the advice of the strangely animated man standing out in the rain, and take the little unmarked road out into the middle of nowhere ...

Smtaliouinekasbahdetail0001.JPGWe were trying to get to Marrakesh to stay with a Moroccan family: Jean-jacques Gérard had arranged for us to stay with his in-laws, and we were excited to see what real Moroccan home cooking was like.  They say that the best food here is in people's homes, and we'd started to suspect that there was something in this.  We'd realised that lots of the interesting stuff is done by women: this means it's usually done at home - so you don't come across it on the standard tourist trail.

For example, finding the women who know how to make couscous the old-fashioned way, rolling it by hand, had taken us quite a while (although we managed it in the end).  Our new mission was to find the women who make warka ...

Where there's wheat

turkey
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Smsimiturfa0001.jpgWhile you may well find rice or potatoes as the starch on your dinner plate, and plenty of dried beans and pulses cooked up in your stews, and even desserts, it is wheat that has to be the principal starch-provider of Turkey.  After all, it was in ancient Mesopotamia, and probably around the modern-day town of Diyarbakır in eastern Turkey, that wheat was first domesticated by man more than 10 thousand years ago.
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