Results tagged “pickles”

Spring preserving workshops, Fri 27th & Sat 28th April 2012

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smPreservingClassesJune20110027.jpgIn partnership with Riverford, the lovely organic veg box people, I offer seasonal preserving workshops.  We cover all the basics of preserving fruits and vegetables and together we make five you can take home.

You'll learn about sterilising jars, using sugar, salt and vinegar correctly as preservatives, reaching ‘setting point’ for jams and jellies, safe bottling and more. Class sizes are kept small and very hands-on.  As well as your filled jars, there are recipes and guidance notes to take home.  

smmixedpickles0001.jpgAt the Spring workshops we will make:

Rhubarb, cranberry & anise chutney
Lebanese pickled beetroots & turnips
Spiced carrot jam
Proper pickled eggs
Bengal ginger & chilli chutney
Wild garlic pesto, if available

The exact menu may change slightly nearer the time when we know what produce the fields will be yielding!

“Thank you for a really inspiring and enjoyable day Spring Preserving.  It’s just amazing what was produced and it made for an excellent Mothering Sunday! The atmosphere was so good and you really create a great event.  I look forward to the next.”

“I greatly enjoyed the workshop.  I thought there was the right combination of instruction, hands on experience and nice people.  The lunch provided was delicious.”


Dates:  Saturday 28th April 2012, repeated Friday 27th and/or Sunday 29th according to demand

Time:  10am - 3pm

Location:  London N5

Price:  £70 (includes lunch with wine)

To book:  email Anna  Please read the booking terms & conditions before booking your place.  Thank you.


Late Autumn preserving workshops, 11th, 12th & 13th Nov 2011

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smpreserving2410100014.JPGIn association with Riverford, the lovely organic veg box people, I offer seasonal preserving workshops.  I cover all the basics of preserving fruits and vegetables and together we make five you can take home.

You will learn about sterilising jars, using sugar, salt and vinegar correctly as preservatives, reaching ‘setting point’ for jams and jellies, safe bottling and more. Class sizes are kept small (max 8 people) and very hands-on.  As well as your filled jars, there are recipes and guidance notes to take home.  

At the Late Autumn workshops we hope to make (subject to produce availability):

Quince cheese (membrillo)smjellymembrillo0001.JPG
Sage & garlic jelly
Balsamic pickled onions
Bottled pears in spiced red wine
Beetroot & ginger chutney

Dates:  Friday 11th November, repeated Saturday 12th and Sunday 13th November

Time:  10am - 3pm

SmPreservingClassesJune2011Kate2.jpgLocation:  London N5

Price:  £60 (includes light lunch)

To book:  email Anna  Please read the booking terms & conditions before booking your place.  Thank you.

"Thanks again for such a brilliant day and for sharing your wonderful skills. I can't believe how much we made and how much I learned in your lovely kitchen!"

"The pace was just right- a good combination of a bit of the science behind preserving, a hands on approach to learning, and the opportunity to chat and discuss. I think the size of the class was ideal."





Lacto-fermented cucumbers

poland
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Lacto-fermenting is another way of pickling.  Instead of using vinegar, you use a salt solution and wait for some special (naturally existing) bacteria to work their magic.  The gherkins retain more of their vitamins and there are other health benefits too.  More importantly, they don’t have that overpowering vinegary tang and taste delicious.

smgherkins0007.JPGHere’s the science bit:  The salt solution favours the proliferation of lactic acid bacteria.  These bacteria (of which there are many species) ferment carbohydrates into lactic acid, carbon dioxide and other organic acids without the need for oxygen.  This turns the solution acidic and replaces the air at the top of the jar with carbon dioxide gas.  So, other (unwanted) bacteria will now not be able to reproduce. 

American recipe books will contain warnings, or not include this method of preserving at all.  But this kind of fermentation has been used across the world for centuries.  We came across plenty of food preserved this way on our culinary travels in 2008:  In Poland we loved the big barrels of gherkins and cabbage (ie sauerkraut); in Turkey we ate and drank yoghurt with everything we could; in Morocco our chicken tagines came with preserved lemons; in Mali we drank lots of millet beer; and in Ghana we filled up on fufu (fermented cassava and unripe plantain, pounded to a sticky stodge).

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