Results tagged “pork”

Catalan Pig Day, Sat 1st March & Sun 2nd March 2014

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salami.jpegJoin Catalan culinary expert Rachel McCormack and Anna for a glorious day of pig cookery and general piggery.  We will celebrate the pig by using its various parts for a delicious  breakfast, hearty lunch and sausages to take away, as is done at the annual pig slaughter in villages around the world. 

 

We will make:

Frit Mallorquin - a breakfast dish using liver

Boiled and roasted pig's face - a crispy snack

Trotters a la Catalana - to enjoy for lunch with rice, and roasted with honey

Catalan black pudding - with a couple of variations

Fuet sausages - a classic Catalan salami

...and if time, some pig's brain paté so as not to waste anything.

 

Rachel is originally from Scotland but spent most of her twenties living in Barcelona, where she caught the Catalan obsession with food.  She now lives in London where she teaches cooking classes, runs food markets and writes about food.  She is also a regular panelist on BBC Radio 4's The Kitchen Cabinet, for which Anna works as food consultant behind the scenes (having had the idea for the show). 

 

pigday.jpegRachel has run several very popular Pig Days at other venues for crowds of 20-30 people.  This event will be in Anna's home teaching kitchen and is limited to just 8 guests.  It will be a very hands on class, with plenty of pig for everyone to get their hands into.  Not for the squeamish.

 

Dates: Saturday 1st March, repeated Sunday 2nd March 2014

Time: 10am - 4pm

Location: London N5

Price: £120, or two places for £216 (includes breakfast and a late lunch with wine)

To book:
email Anna Please read the booking terms & conditions before booking your place. Thank you.

Cider-braised pork with pickled leeks and horseradish

denmark
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Pork shoulder is suited to slow cooking and will be melt-in-the-mouth tender given time.  The cider braising liquid, lightly pickled leeks and punchy horseradish make this a surprisingly clean and bright dish.  Serve with potatoes or pearled rye or spelt.  

Braised pork.JPGRecipe adapted from Mia Kristensen of CPH Good Food.  www.cphgoodfood.dk

Whitmuir Farm

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esb.jpgExcerpt from Eat Slow Britain by Alastair Sawday & Anna Colquhoun:

… At first cattle and lambs were trucked four-hundreds miles to a slaughter house in Devon, from where meat travelled to supermarkets across Britain. If supply outstripped demand, orders were reduced or delayed without notice. If animals grew too large, they were rejected as unsuitable for the mechanised processes. “For all we knew our meat ended up on shelves down the road, yet untraceable to Whitmuir. We wanted to take control and know our customers.”

smwhitmuirfarm0001.JPGA gift of two Tamworth sows - Cinnamon and Nutmeg, thought to be sterile yet proving prolific - spurred the move to direct sales. A tiny shop was swapped for a bigger one and now they have a restaurant, too. “We invested everything and have more risk and direct accountability to consumers, but we wouldn’t go back to anonymous wholesale.”

... Whitmuir’s Shorthorn cattle only eat grass. This gives their meat a healthier balance of Omega-6s to Omega-3s, and softer, yellower fat. Calves also wean naturally. An early attempt to hasten the process by luring cows away to a field of tasty kale resulted in disaster when they trashed three electric fences and a gate to reclaim their young …

Whitmuir Farm, Scottish Borders, Scotland

Andalucian pinchitos morunos

spain
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These spicy kebabs are popular in Andalucia and originate from the era when the Moors occupied Spain.  It works superbly with pork, chicken or lamb.  Marinate the meat as far in advance as possible.  This recipe is adapted from one in the fantastic Moro restaurant cookbook.
 
smpinchitosmorunos0001.JPG

And the nominations are ...

burkina faso
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Smetreburkinabe.JPGTen minutes into Burkina Faso, and we knew it was going to be a dead cert for that most coveted of awards: Most Friendly Border Guards Anywhere Ever. The Malians will be disappointed, I know, after a very strong showing indeed, but the Burkinabés trumped them from their very first "Bienvenue!". This is the way to welcome new arrivals to your country -- friendly, enthusiastic, helpful, interested and generally very correct. UK Customs and Immigration could certainly stand to learn a thing or two ...

Smsoumbalapounding.JPGAnd now that we've spent a (too too short) while here, that's not the only award it's been nominated for. It's up for the hotly contested Chef Most Generous With His Time prize, is the bookie's favourite for Most Surprising Yoghurt-Offal Combination, has several entries in the extremely competitive Tastiest Street Food category, and is way out in the lead in the (admittedly less competitive) Most Impressive Cross-Town Inter-Generational Search For An Obscure 70s Funk Album.

Let's open those envelopes, and find out just what they won ...

In search of the perfect pig

spain
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Smcastellsign0001.jpgAs we got higher into the Pyrenees, the road signs got gradually less French.  Call it Occitan, call it Catalan - whichever way you look at it we were moving into new territory.  As if to illustrate the point, we also quickly found ourselves in the middle of the biggest hailstorm I've ever seen.  This, of course, was the perfect moment to discover that our sunroof didn't seal properly.

Smpatanegra0001.jpgWe'd come to Spain to settle an argument.  Ever since visiting Hungary, something had been nagging away at us (and I don't just mean Barnaby).  Which is the true king of pigs?  In the Spanish corner, the pata negra pig, black of foot, fed on acorns and cossetted like a prize sumo wrestler (do sumo wrestlers eat acorns? Probably).  In the Hungarian corner, the mangalica, curly of hair, and a whacking 70% body fat.  Both tasty, no doubt - but in the world of cured pork products there can be only one winner.  Only time, and extensive sampling, would tell ...

Plain to be seen

hungary
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Smtanya0001.JPGThe puszta - the great plain - is very important to Hungarians.  It may not sound very interesting to outsiders: it's the flattest part of the country, dotted with fairly shabby isolated farms, wells, marshland and perhaps not a great deal else.  But here it means more than that: it holds an important place in the Hungarian imagination and sense of national identity.

As we found out, though, it's also a place to hear lively folk music, eat the best bread and pork fat we've found so far (and that's saying a lot), and learn how to play the pig's bladder while cracking a whip. At least, it is if you're coordinated enough, which one of us was ...

Carnitas

california, mexico
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Carnitas was the last dish I cooked here in San Francisco.  It's Mexican, porky and delicious, and was therefore a very fitting final dinner in our apartment.  It's a Mexican classic and one I'd had many times at local taquerias.  You can find all sorts of recipes for carnitas, involving different meats, flavourings and cooking methods.  This pork 'n' lard version is the real deal.  My method follows that of the chef at Mexico DF restaurant, who shared it after we'd devoured several pounds of the stuff.  It is meltingly tender on the inside, crispy on the outside and wonderfully porky.  You will be in pig heaven.

carnitas.jpgSince the carnitas-fest we have been desperately trying to get round all the Bay Area restaurants we wanted to try, while packing up all our stuff. I now sit in a beautifully clean and empty flat, with a whole hour to go until we leave for the airport.  Never before have we been so timely and organised before catching a plane.

This one's for Tamar, Raquel, Megan, Carri and Will, who actually gave us money for our furniture.  Tamar liked it so much she decided it would be easier just to move in when we leave.

Chorizo

mexico, spain
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Chorizo is pronounced ‘chorissoh’ or, in some parts of Spain, ‘chorithoh’, but never ‘choritzoh’, please.

It comes in all sorts of varieties in many countries around the world, notably Spain, Portugal and Mexico, but also India (Goa, due to Portuguese colonial presence), Argentina and the Philippines.

Spanish chorizo is usually, but not always, cured, and therefore edible as is, sliced.  It’s made from coarsely chopped fatty pork and flavoured with garlic and smoked paprika.  It can be hot - ‘picante’, or sweet - ‘dulce’.

Mexican chorizo, on the other hand, is a very different sausage - made from ground pork, flavoured with additional spices such as cinnamon, and importantly, requires cooking.

Bánh Mì

vietnam
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The Vietnamese adopted the baguette from their French colonists and put it to very good use in these delicious ‘Saigon sandwiches’.  This is the perfect way to use up leftover roast meats, especially pork, and ideally Chinese BBQ-style char siu pork.  This recipe fuses techniques from Andrea Nguyen’s book ‘Into the Vietnamese Kitchen’ with inspiration from Saigon Sandwich*, by far the best hole-in-the-wall bánh mì purveyor in all of San Francisco.

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Char siu pork

china, vietnam
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This is a popular Chinese barbecue dish, also common in Vietnam, where it’s called thit xá xíu.  It is absolutely delicious with rice and salad, in bánh mì (Vietnamese baguette sandwiches), in steamed buns or just on its own as soon as you’ve sliced it.  This recipe is thanks to Andrea Nguyen, author of ‘Into the Vietnamese Kitchen: Treasured Foodways, Modern Flavors’.

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Pot stickers

california, japan
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OK, this one looks a little long and complicated... BUT you should try it as really it's easy and the results are delicious.  Let me know which option you like best if you try them.  I guess Sainsbury's might not do pot sticker wrappers and you may need visit your local Chinatown, if you have one.  They will be in the refrigerated section.

Pot stickers.JPGThere are hundreds of different recipes for pot stickers.  The Japanese version tends to use thinner wrappers, which I prefer to the more doughy Chinese version.  I was inspired to experiment with different fillings and wrappers by the delicious pot stickers you can get in little dim sum restaurants in San Francisco's Chinatown.  I couldn't decide which of these three fillings I liked best, which is why you're getting them all...
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