Results tagged “shellfish”

Fish in a Day, Fri 23rd & Sat 24th March 2012

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Nicola filleting credit Eating East.jpgHUBBUB_STRAP_red.pngThis workshop is a partnership between Culinary Anthropologist and the lovely people at Hubbub, who deliver top quality produce from your local fishmonger, butcher, cheesemonger and deli to your door.

We will focus on preparing and cooking sustainably caught fish and shellfish, such as lemon sole, sardines, mackerel, squid, oysters and mussels

smfishinadayoct20110056t.jpgAnna will show you how to fillet flat and round fish, shuck oysters and prepare other shellfish.  Everyone will have a go!

You will then cook your prepared seafood in various ways for a delicious and extensive Mediterranean seafood feast to share with plenty of wine to drink. 

smfishshellfishclass3010100009t.jpgThe menu will include (subject to availability):
Oysters three ways (including raw and baked)
Mackerel escabeche
Classic moules marinières
Lemon sole en papillote with leeks and dill
Risotto nero with braised and fried squid


You will go home confident to cook more fish and shellfish at home, a pack of all the recipes and a new appreciation of sustainable seafood choices.  This is an intensive hands-on class, so come hungry to learn and to feast!


Dates:  Friday 23rd & Saturday 24th March 2012

Time:  10am - 3pm

Location:  London N5

Price:  £95


To book:  Email Anna

Please read the booking terms & conditions before booking your place.  Thank you.

Fish filleting photo credit Eating East.



Fish in a Day, Saturday 29th Oct 2011

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Nicola filleting credit Eating East.jpgFood Safari new logo.bmpThis workshop is a partnership between Culinary Anthropologist and the lovely Food Safari people.

We will focus on preparing and cooking sustainably caught fish and shellfish, such as lemon sole, mackerel, squid, oysters and crab.  All the seafood will be sourced from Food Safari partners Pinney’s of Orford and Maximus Sustainable Fishing both family enterprises that fish off the Suffolk coast using long line rods to reduce waste.

smAnnacrabt.jpgDuring the workshop you will hear from one of the fishermen about their business, the challenges and the stock levels in the North Sea.  Anna will show you how to fillet flat and round fish, shuck oysters and prepare other shellfish.  You will then cook them in various ways for a delicious and extensive Mediterranean seafood feast to share with plenty of wine to drink. 

bouillabaisse.JPGYou will go home confident to cook more fish and shellfish at home, a pack of all the recipes and a new appreciation of how fish reaches our plates.  This is an intensive hands-on class, so come hungry to learn and to feast!


Dates:  Saturday 29th October 2011

Time:  10am - 4pm smfishshellfishclass3010100009t.jpg

Location:  London N5

Price:  £150, or £275 for two

Book online on the Food Safari website

Or email Anna with any queries or to ask about the special discount for Culinary Anthropologist customers



Fish filleting photo credit Eating East.




Crabs

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Smbrowncrabs0003.JPGThere are crabs in all the world’s oceans, in freshwaters and on the land.  I once met a man in Rarotonga called Piri Puruto (‘the Coconut King’) who kept large red land crabs as pets - crawling free around the living room.  The smallest is the minuscule Pea Crab which lives inside oysters, and the largest is the Japanese Spider Crab, with a leg span of up to 4m.

You don’t want to be an Alaskan King Crab fisherman; 300 of every 100,000 are killed every year, the highest fatality rate of all professions.

Scallops

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Smscallops0001.jpgScallops swim by rapidly opening and closing their shells.

They are hermaphroditic.  The colour of their roe is determined by the gender of the parent (at the time).  Red = female.  White = male.

Scallops have eyes!  In fact, over 60 of them.  They’re blue.  We don’t eat them though.  We just eat the muscle that holds the shells together, which is sometimes, confusingly, called ‘the eye’.

Try to buy ‘dry packed’ scallops as they are additive-free.  ‘Wet-packed’ ones contain a chemical to make them absorb water before being frozen.

The scallop shell is the emblem of St James, hence the dish coquilles St Jacques.  In Dutch scallops are Jakobsschelp.  Rumour has it that St James fell into a river and came out covered in scallops, which seems unlikely.

A delicious way to eat scallops is with orange-tarragon beurre blanc.

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