The Mistley Thorn

uk
| | Comments (0)
esb.jpgExcerpt from Eat Slow Britain by Alastair Sawday & Anna Colquhoun:

As a teenager, Sherri Singleton sold watermelon fruit cups on the beach in Los Angeles for pocket money. It was the first of a series of successful culinary enterprises, stretching from California to Essex, where she now runs two restaurants and a cooking school. “Food is in my blood: my great grandmother ran a gourmet food store, my grandmother had a restaurant, my mother cooked everything from scratch and grew vegetables, and our neighbour, a celebrated chef, roasted pigs in his garden. I was surrounded by people who adored food.”

smmistleythorn0001.JPGArriving in Essex in the eighties was a shock to Sherri’s culinary system - where were the bundles of fresh coriander and basil, the heirloom tomatoes? She found excellent meat, seafood and cheese, but couldn’t lay her hands on local fruit and vegetables. So Sherri persuaded smallholders to grow for her, something many other restaurateurs wouldn’t catch onto for years.

smmistleythorn0002.JPG“Now it’s ridiculously easy. People pick samphire for me, grow asparagus in their gardens, leave boxes of quinces and squashes on my doorstep. And we grow artichokes, sprouting broccoli and blackcurrants ourselves.”  …

The Mistley Thorn, Essex, England

0 TrackBacks

Listed below are links to blogs that reference this entry: The Mistley Thorn.

TrackBack URL for this entry: http://www.culinaryanthropologist.org/mt/mt-tb.cgi/358

Leave a comment

Archives

Culinary Anthropologist